There is absolutely no reason why kosher food and desserts have to be anything less than what everyone else is eating. Share with me your baking and cooking sucesses, challenges, and disasters. I will share my recipes, shabbat and holiday menu planning and my love of food.

Monday, November 25, 2013

Cranberry and Raspberry Rugelach

We are in the final countdown to Thankgivikkuh and no one has enjoyed this convergence as much as I have. I still have more ideas, but it is time to actually start planning my own Thanksgiving dinner and make my shopping lists. Many of my Thanksgiving recipes can be found on

Remember that your copies of The Kosher Baker have recipes for lots of dairy free tarts and pies including pumpkin, mocha pecan, key lime, pear and almond and more, and The Holiday Kosher Baker will cover the entire week of Chanukah desserts plus all your gift-giving needs. Help me make the Jewish world a sweeter place.

Final Thanksgivikkuh thoughts: At your Thanksgiving tables, please honor the history of both holidays, which offer a chance to discuss how we feel as Jewish Americans. My four children, who have studied Jewish history for years, will appreciate how lucky we are to live in a country that allows us to live a full Jewish life without fear of persecution. 

All of the mainstream press that my fellow Jewish chefs and I have enjoyed over the past few weeks, discussing the culinary opportunities afforded by Thanksgivikkuh, shows the important role Jewish food plays in the general American food scene. I feel privileged to have been a part of it.

Before you make your final shopping lists, add the ingredients for this elegant cookie. This cranberry rugelach is another tasty mashup of traditional Jewish dessert meets the best of Thanksgiving flavors. 

More recipes:

A brand new recipe for chocolate cranberry mandelbread can be found on the New York Times Well blog.

The Chicago Tribunefeatured my recipe for apple latkes. 

Wishing you a delicious Thanksgivikkuh!

Cranberry and Raspberry Rugelach
Makes 60 to 70 pieces

1 cup (2 sticks) parve margarine
8 ounces parve cream cheese, softened
2 cups plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour, plus extra for rolling out dough
1 tablespoon confectioners’ sugar

1 cup raspberry jam
4 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 cup dried cranberries

To make the dough: Place the margarine, cream cheese, flour, and confectioners’ sugar in the bowl of a mixer or food processor fitted with a metal blade and mix just until dough comes together. You can also mix the dough together by hand with a wooden spoon in a large bowl.

Divide the dough in half and wrap each ball in plastic and flatten. Freeze 2 hours or overnight. Let thaw just until you can press into it. 

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Place a large sheet of parchment on the counter. Sprinkle some flour on the parchment, place one of the dough discs on the parchment, sprinkle again with flour, and then top with a second sheet of parchment.

Rolling on top of the parchment, roll out the disc of dough to 13 x 10 inches. Peel back the top parchment a few times while rolling and sprinkle more flour on the dough. Remove the top parchment and reserve for re-use. Spread half of the raspberry jam evenly on the dough. Combine sugar and cinnamon in a small bowl and then sprinkle half on top of the jam. Sprinkle half of the cranberries on top.

Fold the right and left sides (the short sides) of the dough 1/2 inch in toward the center to keep the filling inside. Using the parchment to help you, roll the long side from the top toward you, rolling as tightly as you can.

Line a cookie sheet with parchment. Place the loaf on the cookie sheet with the seam on the bottom and flatten slightly. Repeat for the second disc of dough and the remaining filling.

Bake for 40 minutes or until the top begins to brown. Let cool and then slice into 1-inch pieces. These can be frozen. Store covered with plastic or in an airtight container at room temperature for five days or freeze for up to three months.

Adapted from Paula Shoyer, The Kosher Baker: 160 dairy-free desserts from traditional to trendy (Brandeis 2010)

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